I did what I could, but things don’t always change as quickly as you want them to

I have minimal patience for people who get stuck, accept it, and then complain about it without striving for change. But don’t worry– this isn’t a post about other people, it’s a post about me. Because the flip side of those who prefer “victim” status and inaction is when you do things and it’s not enough.

I have a funny conversation with my amazing chiropractor every time I see her. Whether I’m feeling good or bad, there is always so much chaos in my life that I have trouble labeling what helped or hurt the most. That’s probably one of my character flaws. If there is chaos, I dive right in. I say yes to help before fully considering the impact on my own life or those close to me.

Since December 12, my supervisors at my warehouse job have been trying to meet my new workplace accommodations for my cerebral palsy. This move for accommodations, on my part, was not spurred by a change in my physical condition, but my a change in how the company measures employee performance. Since I have been with the company for more than two years, experience has shown that I cannot meet the new standard. It took me about a year to consistently hit the previous measure.

My neurologist, who is also a physiatrist, and I adore her, literally wrote, “limit bending/crouching as much as possible to improve endurance.”

And so, during the course of the last several weeks, I have made most of my metrics with the support of the other staff in bringing me work that doesn’t require me pulling it out of shelves near the floor. We’ve slowly moved me to a work station near the back, so the support staff bringing the work doesn’t need to look for me or drag the work everywhere. We found a work station the right height and that directs the completed work to the left so I don’t have to stress my right hip.

This is after two weeks of a different table every day. Setting up a work station at the end of the day with supplies and my work to start the next day only to be moved somewhere else and given “standard” work in the morning. This is after the stares of my coworkers who are not on my team, as they linger around my work station wanting to figure out why I’m getting special treatment but unwilling to ask questions.

Until one of the nicer people, who still has the attitude of the others who don’t take kindly to us outsiders who originally came from second shift, offhandedly says, “because you have a real disability, right?”

I’ve been working hard in the gym, and set some new PRs on my weights, and since my holiday workouts my hamstrings have been super tight and spasming. The last time I did legs I probably overdid it. But everything was moving so well and I felt so strong so I hope this discomfort is my body trying to build new muscle and new connections with my nervous system, Because that’s my disability– my nervous system doesn’t communicate correctly with my lower body, making it impossible for my brain to tell my muscles to relax.

I don’t know if that’s why my mid-section, as in lower back and hips, has so much discomfort and burning pain, and why my legs ache. That workout was on Saturday morning and it’s Wednesday now. Maybe I’m being punished for binging Fleischman is in Trouble on Hulu for New Years or maybe I’m inflamed because I’ve been living on Christmas cookies and cake.

Who knows? But yesterday was hard and I couldn’t reach my feet or the floor and today I’m having more trouble bending. I see the chiropractor after work, so maybe she’ll have answers. I also forgot to wrap my toe yesterday. That meant that in addition to basic mobility issues it felt like someone had a knife in my toe all day.

But I hit my numbers, even did two extra, and set up my table with about 90 minutes of easy work and new rolls of supplies. And then I received work that I was being labor-shared today. And that has me upset and anxious. I’m folding clothes, just like I normally do, but today I’m supposed to do men’s clothes instead of women’s.

Last time I worked in men’s, it was awful. The clothes are bigger than I am and they don’t fit in the boxes, because the boxes are the same size of the women’s boxes but men have bigger bodies and much bigger feet. Plus, will they honor my accommodations? Will they put me on the left?

It took three weeks to get things comfortable for me in my own department. And my biggest fear is, when I return to my department, I’ll have to start all over with them.

Meanwhile, in the good news camp, The Teenager and I visited some friends last night so she could learn how to change her own headlight bulbs in her car and then she took me out for food. She might not believe me when I say it, but I really do love these small moments with her.

In other thoughts, when I get through my current financial straits (I have $3.92 in my checkbook and a $700 medical bill, the garbage bill is rumored to have gone up 200% and I’m still paying off my new ceiling and new computer), I really want an Apple Watch. I wonder if it could do a better job tracking my mobility and my activity. I’m really curious what all that clothes-folding counts as.

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